[header_hero imageid="5433"]

How We Help

The Security Team

[/header_hero]

Security operations centers (SOC) are the epicenter of defensive cybersecurity within every enterprise. Typically, SOC analysts get the unenvious job of dealing with the mundane events. They wade through events, cutting and pasting data, fighting with IT for network data and other tasks that prevent them from doing what they know will reduce risk. This drives high turnover as analysts burn out from a career that often feels thankless.

Reducing the mundane, increasing Transform how your security team detects, reviews and triages potential incidents with BluVector. Built by analysts for analysts, BluVector combines the latest in advanced threat detection with the surrounding information your analysts need to review, triage and understand risk.

SOC Analyst

The SOC analyst’s role within the security team is often the person on the front lines of identifying, defending or responding to cybersecurity events. Typically, the SOC analyst is very technically-minded, more junior to mid-level in experience, but tasked with undercovering real security threats from the volume of events fed back to enterprise solutions such as a SIEM or Splunk. When events are suspect, the SOC analyst then engages with the incident response, IT operations and threat intel teams to do a deeper analysis or formulate a response. Motivated by finding the threats, SOC analysts are focused on efficacy, speed, accuracy and completeness of their work by having the right tools will help them increase that focus.

Challenges

  • Are we detecting the most dangerous threats to the company?
  • Too many events to analyze them all, is the SOC monitoring and reviewing the most critical events
  • Already bought too many stove-piped tools; they don’t work well together and some just collect dust
  • We work long hours and are drowning in events; hard to be confident that we are seeing the threat actors

SOC Director

Reporting directly to the CISO, the Security Operations Center Director is a crucial part of the security team. Often more technical than the CISO in smaller to large organizations, they are tasked with managing security analysts, threat intel teams, incident response and triage teams. Their goals also differ as they’re more targeted on metrics in detecting, diagnosing and responding to threats. As people and process managers, they use their perspective to find new efficiencies to decrease the security team’s reaction time and increasing their performance with the use of training or tools that optimize their team’s work.

Challenges

  • Are we detecting the most dangerous threats to the company?
  • Too many events to analyze them all, is the SOC monitoring and reviewing the most critical events
  • Already bought too many stove-piped tools
  • Accurate Situational Awareness of the network and potential adversaries
  • Workforce turnover, enough skilled staff that are knowledgeable about the company’s business
  • Collaboration between security and the other teams within IT is not timely and aids in an adversary’s success

Incident Responder

Within any organization, Incident Reponse is a crucial component of, or often, comprises several roles within the security team. Reporting directly to a CISO or CIO, they are very technical and very experienced to run or perform a wide variety of cybersecurity tasks. While other roles might have particular ranges or responsibilities, they run the organization’s day-to-day security team operations from monitoring a SIEM for security events, analyzing events for maliciousness and responsibility for combating threats. Their motivations are a composite of a larger organization’s security team’s focal points with an eye on efficiency of operations, speed of remediation and ensuring the overall security of the network.

Challenges

  • Security needs 24/7 attention but lacking a complete team for coverage
  • Ensuring that we detecting the most dangerous threats to the company?
  • Too many events to analyze them all
  • Focused on effects, integration, ease of use, and overall value
  • Constantly tuning the security tools to increase operational efficiency
  • Works long hours and is drowning in events
  • Accurate Situational Awareness of the network and potential adversaries

Chief Information Security Officer / Chief Security Officer

The role of the CISO is drastically different than the rest of the security team. Seasoned with years of experience, they are tasked with managing and setting goals and expectations for an organization’s entire security process. These responsibilities include compliance, budget, strategic planning and optimization across the security operations, security engineering/architecture, compliance/audit and incident response teams. That means CISOs focus on a gamut of areas including compliance, risk and operational efficiency. Unlike other security professionals, despite many years in IT or security, their technical skills vary as their role in the security team is managing budget and staff, justifying budget expenses and reporting security success or concerns to the rest of the C-suite or board.

Challenges

  • Hard to measure the success of the security program
  • Are we detecting the most dangerous threats to the company?
  • Too many events to analyze them all, is the SOC monitoring and reviewing the most critical events
  • Already bought too many stove-piped tools
  • Accurate Situational Awareness of the network and potential adversaries
  • Justifying current and future security budgets
  • Workforce turnover, enough skilled staff that are knowledgeable about the company’s business

See it in action. Schedule a demo.